Spacebuzz

Blog posts tagged with science

Posts in the past four weeks

Friday
Apr 11 2014
17:37 UTC

Follow-Up on Skydiving Meteorite: Crowdsourcing Concludes it Was Just a Rock

For all those involved with the initial investigation of the skydiver and the possible meteorite, they now feel they have resolution to their puzzle, thanks to the beauty of crowdsourcing. The rock that showed up in a video taken during a skydive in Norway in 2012 was likely just a rock — accidentally packed in […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
Apr 09 2014
15:22 UTC

Just Another Hazy Day on Titan

The weather forecast for Titan? Cloudy, hazy, and cold — just like every other day! The image here is a color-composite made from raw data captured by Cassini during a flyby on April 7, 2014, and it shows a look at the two main features of Titan's atmosphere: a thick orange “smog” made of organic […]

Posted by Lights in the Dark

Wednesday
Apr 09 2014
07:47 UTC

a starbug sings starwars

one of the major technologies we develop at the AAO is various ways to position hundreds of optical fibres before astronomical observations. my current favourites are the mini-robot starbugs. they are stuck to a glass plate by vaccuum and then "crawl" across the glass, which is located inside a telescope's light path. each starbug moves independently, programmed to stop where the light from a particular galaxy will be aligned. when a voltage is applied to the inside cy

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
Apr 08 2014
13:41 UTC

Visiting the Place Where We Talk to Space

When you're talking to spacecraft billions of miles away, you need a powerful┬voice. And when you're listening for their faint replies from those same staggering distances, you need an even bigger set of ears. Fortunately, NASA's Deep Space Network has both — and last┬week I had the chance to see some of them up close […]

Posted by Lights in the Dark

Tuesday
Apr 08 2014
02:10 UTC

Mercury's Volcanoes

Here is some more interesting news coming out about Mercury from the MESSENGER spacecraft. It was long thought that Mercury didn't really have major, explosive volcanism in the past, like the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. For that, you need volatiles, or compounds that boil at relatively low temperatures, astronomically speaking. When the planets were forming around the nascent Sun, most of the volatiles of the inner solar system were boiled off before inner planets fully formed. Lucky for

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

Tuesday
Apr 01 2014
21:48 UTC

How to Solve a Physics Problem

most of my undergraduate days... i tried to let 13 and 14 linger before reading parts b and c of the problem :)How to Solve a Physics Problem by SMBC.

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
Apr 01 2014
17:51 UTC

Neil Armstrong: Why The World Needs Nerdy Engineers' (In Animated Form)

Combine the gravitas of humanity's first moon visitor with the whimsy of animation, and the result is pure fun. Here, you can see Neil Armstrong's address┬to the National Press Club on Feb. 22, 2000 about how engineering made the world a lot better in the past century. Providing animation is Ph. D. comics creator Jorge Chan. […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
Mar 26 2014
18:34 UTC

Distant new world may point to undiscovered planets in solar system Stuart Clark

Todays discovery of dwarf planet 2012 VP113 suggests that many planet-sized worlds lurk undetected beyond the orbit of Pluto, maybe even a giant Super EarthWe learned today that our solar system is larger than we had previously known. A newly discovered, extremely distant dwarf planet with the tentative name of 2012 VP113 was announced. It appears as nothing more than a dot on images but we know a few things about it. For a start, it is approximately 450km across, which is pretty small by planeta

Posted by Across the universe

Wednesday
Mar 26 2014
11:26 UTC

Searching for life on Mars: where should the ExoMars rover land? Dr Peter Grindrod

Dr Peter Grindrod: On Wednesday, the European Space Agency starts considering potential landing sites on Mars for its 2018 ExoMars missionDr Peter Grindrod

Posted by Across the universe

Friday
Mar 21 2014
19:50 UTC

cosmic inflation

... discovery. as with any science experiment, i will let myself get much more excited when another experiment verifies the result, but in the meantime, there's a fascinating discussion happening on a facebook page created just before t

Posted by astropixie

Friday
Mar 21 2014
15:59 UTC

Direct or indirect?

This week has seen the potentially momentous result from the BICEP2 experiment indicating the detection of gravitational waves from the inflationary era of the Universe, just a tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang. It's a fantastic result, and if/when confirmed by other experiments (e. g., Planck) will be huge leap in developing our understanding of the beginnings of the Universe. Many other people have discussed the background (that's just a scattering of a few of the m

Posted by Cosmic Zoo

Wednesday
Mar 19 2014
00:30 UTC

Zoom Around the Gigapan Moon

NASA just released a huge mosaic of the lunar North Pole with images taken over four years with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. This mosaic was carefully constructed with over 10,000 images from LRO's Narrow Angle Camera with all the images having roughly the same angle of illumination. As we've explored here before, LRO's orbit takes it over the same spots of the Moon when the Sun is at different positions in the lunar “sky” so that the shadows look different

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

Tuesday
Mar 18 2014
13:12 UTC

Herbal Medicines, an Interview

Last night a short news segment on herbal medicines ran on Channel 9 which I not only appeared on, but actually referenced my research. You can see the interview here: https://www. youtube. com/watch?v=3audRUF7C2I&feature=youtube_gdata_playerI have done a lot of radio, but I'm pretty much a newbie at television. Despite me not looking at the interviewer, waving my arms around and having the camera peer up my nose, the interview that went to air was a lot less mortifying than I thou

Posted by Astroblog

Monday
Mar 17 2014
15:32 UTC

Moons and Planets, All This Week at #LPSC2014

... favorite scientists and science communicators are there, sharing out the results to be public, including Emily Lakdawalla, Sondy Springmann, and Stuart Robbins. Already this morning, we've heard about Vesta's impact history, large craters on Mars, and Titan's hydrocarbons. And this is after all of

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

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