Spacebuzz

Blog posts tagged with science

Posts in the past four weeks

Thursday
Apr 24 2014
15:01 UTC

Pingpong! How You Could Send Something Small High In The Atmosphere

Spring is a time of treasures in eggs — think about the Easter weekend that just passed, for example, or the number of chicks hatching in farms across the world. That's also true of “near-space” exploration. A project called PongSats has sent thousands of tiny experiments into space, and is ready to send up another […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
Apr 23 2014
18:00 UTC

Ken Ham slams religion

... anyone pointedly saying science is a religion, is using the…

Posted by AlunSalt: Ancient Science and the Science of Ancient Things

Tuesday
Apr 22 2014
14:00 UTC

Your Science Results Explained

In this series of posts, we'll be breaking down the recent MoonMappers paper by Robbins et al. showcasing YOUR work.┬ We were super-excited as the paper worked on by this team using your contributions was accepted by the journal Icarus. We put out a press release, as did CU Boulder, and Stuart made two great videos giving an overview of the work. I'll link to the shorter one and embed the longer one below: Naturally some people want even greater

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

Thursday
Apr 17 2014
15:00 UTC

5 Years On Chemotherapy Works

... wrote someone out of my will today. It was five years ago I had chemotherapy for cancer. It should have been six, but I held off getting a diagnosis because I was in the last year of my PhD and helping out with elderly relatives. I wasn't strictly in denial about having cancer, but…

Posted by AlunSalt: Ancient Science and the Science of Ancient Things

Friday
Apr 11 2014
17:37 UTC

Follow-Up on Skydiving Meteorite: Crowdsourcing Concludes it Was Just a Rock

For all those involved with the initial investigation of the skydiver and the possible meteorite, they now feel they have resolution to their puzzle, thanks to the beauty of crowdsourcing. The rock that showed up in a video taken during a skydive in Norway in 2012 was likely just a rock — accidentally packed in […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
Apr 09 2014
16:07 UTC

Strange, Yet Familiar Titan

Planetary surfaces never cease to amaze. Take a look at this new radar image of Titan from Cassini. These long, flowing curves are sand dunes on Saturn's largest Moon, a familiar feature on an utterly alien world. Titan has familiar features such as lakes, mountain, rivers and dunes, but it is not like Earth as we know it today. The lakes and rivers are liquid hydrocarbons like ethane, methane, and propane, the mountains made of super-solid water ice, and these

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

Wednesday
Apr 09 2014
15:22 UTC

Just Another Hazy Day on Titan

The weather forecast for Titan? Cloudy, hazy, and cold — just like every other day! The image here is a color-composite made from raw data captured by Cassini during a flyby on April 7, 2014, and it shows a look at the two main features of Titan's atmosphere: a thick orange “smog” made of organic […]

Posted by Lights in the Dark

Wednesday
Apr 09 2014
07:47 UTC

a starbug sings starwars

one of the major technologies we develop at the AAO is various ways to position hundreds of optical fibres before astronomical observations. my current favourites are the mini-robot starbugs. they are stuck to a glass plate by vaccuum and then "crawl" across the glass, which is located inside a telescope's light path. each starbug moves independently, programmed to stop where the light from a particular galaxy will be aligned. when a voltage is applied to the inside cy

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
Apr 08 2014
13:41 UTC

Visiting the Place Where We Talk to Space

When you're talking to spacecraft billions of miles away, you need a powerful┬voice. And when you're listening for their faint replies from those same staggering distances, you need an even bigger set of ears. Fortunately, NASA's Deep Space Network has both — and last┬week I had the chance to see some of them up close […]

Posted by Lights in the Dark

Tuesday
Apr 08 2014
02:10 UTC

Mercury's Volcanoes

Here is some more interesting news coming out about Mercury from the MESSENGER spacecraft. It was long thought that Mercury didn't really have major, explosive volcanism in the past, like the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. For that, you need volatiles, or compounds that boil at relatively low temperatures, astronomically speaking. When the planets were forming around the nascent Sun, most of the volatiles of the inner solar system were boiled off before inner planets fully formed. Lucky for

Posted by CosmoQuest Blog

Tuesday
Apr 01 2014
21:48 UTC

How to Solve a Physics Problem

most of my undergraduate days... i tried to let 13 and 14 linger before reading parts b and c of the problem :)How to Solve a Physics Problem by SMBC.

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
Apr 01 2014
17:51 UTC

Neil Armstrong: Why The World Needs Nerdy Engineers' (In Animated Form)

Combine the gravitas of humanity's first moon visitor with the whimsy of animation, and the result is pure fun. Here, you can see Neil Armstrong's address┬to the National Press Club on Feb. 22, 2000 about how engineering made the world a lot better in the past century. Providing animation is Ph. D. comics creator Jorge Chan. […]

Posted by Universe Today

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