Spacebuzz

Blog posts tagged with eso

Posts in the past four weeks

Thursday
Jun 25 2015
11:33 UTC

Giant Galaxy is Still Growing

... Messier 87 PR Image eso1525cMessier 87 in the constellation of Virgo Messier 87 has swallowed an entire galaxy in the last billion yearsNew observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed that the giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 has swallowed an entire medium-sized galaxy over the last billion years. For the first time a team of astronomers has been able to track the motions of 300 glo

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Wednesday
Jun 17 2015
11:43 UTC

Best Observational Evidence of First Generation Stars in the Universe

... Universe Videos PR Video eso1524aArtist's impression of CR7: the brightest galaxy in the early Universe VLT discovers CR7, the brightest distant galaxy, and signs of Population III stars Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have discovered by far the brightest galaxy yet found in the early Universe and found strong evidence that examples of the first generation of stars lurk wit

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Friday
Jun 12 2015
05:37 UTC

ESO’s New Gear

... installed on the VLT at ESO's Paranal Observatory. The Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument or SPHERE for short was installed on Unit Telescope 3 of the VLT. SPHERE is a very sophisticated instrument designed to spot exo-planets by direct imaging. SHPERE will have the ability to block out the central […]

Posted by Tom's Astronomy Blog

Wednesday
Jun 10 2015
12:05 UTC

A Celestial Butterfly Emerges from its Dusty Cocoon

... Puppis Videos PR Video eso1523aZooming in on the red giant star L2 Puppis SPHERE reveals earliest stage of planetary nebula formationSome of the sharpest images ever made with ESO

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Tuesday
Jun 09 2015
23:11 UTC

Wide View of the Crab Nebula

... 1952, Messier 1Credit: ESO / Manu MejiasThe Crab Nebula, which also goes by the names Messier 1, NGC 1952 and Taurus A, is one of the best studied astronomical objects in the sky. It is the remnant of a supernova explosion which was observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054. The tangled filaments visible in this image are the remains of the exploded star, which are still expanding outwards at about 1500 kilometres per second. Although not visible to the naked eye due to fore

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Monday
Jun 08 2015
23:11 UTC

Wide View of the Crab Nebula

... 1952, Messier 1Credit: ESO / Manu MejiasThe Crab Nebula, which also goes by the names Messier 1, NGC 1952 and Taurus A, is one of the best studied astronomical objects in the sky. It is the remnant of a supernova explosion which was observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054. The tangled filaments visible in this image are the remains of the exploded star, which are still expanding outwards at about 1500 kilometres per second. Although not visible to the naked eye due to fore

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Monday
Jun 08 2015
03:00 UTC

Sharpest View Ever of Star Formation in the Distant Universe

... (schematic) PR Video eso1522bGravitational lensing of distant star-forming galaxies (schematic) AL

Posted by astronomy cmarchesin

Wednesday
Jun 03 2015
14:22 UTC

Solved: The Riddle of the Nova of 1670

It is a 17thÂcentury astronomical enigma that has persisted right up until modern times. On June 20, 1670, a new star appeared in the evening sky that gave 17th century astronomers pause. Eventually peaking out at +3rd magnitude, the ruddy new star in the modern day constellation of Vulpecula the Fox was visible for almost […]

Posted by Universe Today

Monday
Jun 01 2015
05:04 UTC

The Boomerang Nebula

This image is the Boomerang Nebula, a product of ALMA and Hubble. The Boomerang is 5,000 light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. Click the image above to see the Hubble image without the ALMA data, you will also see why it also has the name of the Bow Tie Nebula. The Boomerang is a protoplanetary […]

Posted by Tom's Astronomy Blog

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