Spacebuzz

Blog posts tagged with astronomy

Posts in the past four weeks

Wednesday
May 27 2015
06:30 UTC

Watch the skies: the season for rare and mysterious noctilucent clouds is here

Noctilucent clouds shimmer in the twilight summer sky on the very edge of space itself. These rare apparitions could be warning us about climate change Sky watchers in the northern hemisphere prepare: the 2015 noctilucent cloud season has begun. These beautiful, rare and mysterious clouds only appear between late-May and late-August at latitudes of 4080 degrees North. They are generally unpredictable but can be seen on clear summer evenings, soon after the sun has set. Composed of ice crystals

Posted by Across the universe

Wednesday
May 27 2015
02:52 UTC

Galaxy's snacking habits revealed

an unexpected part of my position as "outreach officer" has been inheriting the role of "press officer" for the Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO). this isnt something i want to spend too much time on, but i do enjoy the occasional challenge of turning technical science results into fun stories accessible to media sources and a more general audience. for this joint release, i received help and advice from a very experienced science communicator and press officer in western australia

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
May 26 2015
12:46 UTC

Getting Ready For International Space Station Observing Season

The summer season means long days and short nights, as observers in the northern hemisphere must stay up later each evening waiting for darkness to fall. It also means that the best season to spot that orbital outpost of humanitythe International Space Stationis almost upon us. Get set for¬multiple passes a night for observers based […]

Posted by Universe Today

Friday
May 22 2015
12:54 UTC

Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions Remain

The latest views of Ceres' enigmatic white spots are sharper and clearer, but it's obvious that Dawn¬will have to descend much lower before we'll see crucial details hidden in this overexposed splatter of white dots. Still, there are hints of interesting things going on here.(...)Read the rest of Ceres Bright Spots Sharpen But Questions Remain […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
May 20 2015
15:10 UTC

Hunting LightSail in Orbit

The hunt is on in the satellite tracking community, as the U. S. Air Force's super-secret X-37B space plane rocketed into orbit today atop an Atlas V rocket out of Cape Canaveral.¬ This marks the start of OTV-4, the X-37B's fourth trip into low Earth orbit. And though NORAD won't be publishing the orbital elements for […]

Posted by Universe Today

Monday
May 18 2015
17:30 UTC

Standing Stones on a Comet

Boulders in Formation on Comet 67P/Churyumov-GerasimenkoScientists from the OSIRIS camera team for the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission have released a rare image of the surface showing a most impressive site: a group of three icy boulders (one of which is about 30 meters/about 90 feet) across, standing upright on the rugged surface of the

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Monday
May 18 2015
15:10 UTC

What Makes Mars Sunsets Different from Earth's?

Even robots can't tear their eyes from a beautiful sunset. NASA's Mars Curiosity rover pointed its high resolution mast camera at the setting Sun to capture this 4-image sequence on April 15 at the conclusion of the mission's 956th Martian day. While it resembles an earthly sunset, closer inspection reveals¬alien oddities.(...)Read the rest of What […]

Posted by Universe Today

Friday
May 15 2015
19:16 UTC

Pluto: All Known Moons Accounted For

We Stand on the Threshold of DiscoveryTen years ago the New Horizons spacecraft lifted off on the journey of a lifetimeaimed at Pluto and beyond. This week, less than 60 days before its closest approach to the famous dwarf planet, the spacecraft is less than an astronomical unit away from its main target. It's running

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Friday
May 15 2015
18:09 UTC

Andromeda and Milky Way Might Collide Sooner Than We Think

The merger of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxy¬won't happen for another 4 billion years, but the recent discovery of a massive halo of hot gas around Andromeda may¬mean our galaxies are already touching.(...)Read the rest of Andromeda and Milky Way Might Collide Sooner Than We Think (740 words) ¬ Bob King for Universe Today, […]

Posted by Universe Today

Friday
May 15 2015
03:02 UTC

Griffith Observatory Turns 80

Celebrating 8 Decades of Astronomy Outreach!We went to Los Angeles last weekend to celebrate the 80th birthday of the venerable Griffith Observatory. It was 80 years ago today (May 14th), that the observatory opened its doors, and over the years it has served millions of people wonderful views of the sky from its telescope and

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Thursday
May 14 2015
19:00 UTC

Statement affirming respectful debate during current TMT protests

This was submitted to the WiA blog by leaders on diversity issues from within the AAS community. There has also been a statement from AAS President Meg Urry. The last few weeks have brought to a head a confrontation between Native Hawaiian protesters and the Thirty Meter Telescope project. There are varied perspectives on all sides of this issue, amongst supporters and opponents, Hawaiians and mainlanders, astronomers and the general public, and all intersections of these groups. Events associate

Posted by Women In Astronomy

Wednesday
May 13 2015
17:24 UTC

Does the Red Planet Have Green Auroras?

Martian auroras will never best the visual splendor of those we see on Earth, but have no doubt. The Red Planet still has what it takes to throw an auroral bash. Witness the latest news from NASA's MAVEN atmospheric probe.¬(...)Read the rest of Does the Red Planet Have Green Auroras? (596 words) ¬ Bob King […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
May 13 2015
15:21 UTC

Review: Annals of the Deep Sky by Jeff Kanipe & Dennis Webb

Any lover of the night sky knows the value of a good star atlas and an astronomical handbook to guide your exploration of the universe. And while it's true that more information exists out there than ever before online, much of it is intended for a general armchair astronomical audience, or is scattered about the […]

Posted by Universe Today

Tuesday
May 12 2015
22:43 UTC

I'm speaking around sydney

if youre in sydney and want to hear some sciencey astro goodness - i'm speaking at a few events you can attend in the next week and a half. I'll think i'll be incredibly exhausted by the end of this run, but i'm really looking forward to ALL the events. let me know if you will be attending any!1) The Storytelling of Science - Saturday, 16 May 2015, 2-5pm2) Pint of Science - Tuesday, 19 May 2015, Doors Open at 6:30 for 7pm start3) Astronomy Open Night at

Posted by astropixie

Tuesday
May 12 2015
21:35 UTC

A Guide to Saturn Through Opposition 2015

The month of May generally means the end of star party season here in Florida, as schools let out in early June, and humid days make for thunderstorm-laden nights. ¬This also meant that we weren't about to miss the past rare clear weekend at Starkey Park. Jupiter and Venus rode high in the sky, and […]

Posted by Universe Today

Monday
May 11 2015
22:27 UTC

Ceres' White Spots Multiply in Latest Dawn Photos

We don't know exactly what those mysterious white spots on Ceres are yet, but we're getting closer to an explanation. Literally. The latest images from the Dawn spacecraft taken a mere 8,400 miles from the dwarf planet Ceres reveal that the pair of ¬spots are comprised of even more spots.¬(...)Read the rest of Ceres' White […]

Posted by Universe Today

Monday
May 11 2015
21:01 UTC

More Evidence That the Milky Way has Four Arms

Astronomers have been battling over just how many arms our home galaxy has. Is it four? Is it two? Until recently, astronomers assumed the Milky Way was similar to other grand spiral galaxies with four spiral arms. But then observations by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found that it only had two spiral arms. And in […]

Posted by Universe Today

Monday
May 11 2015
12:21 UTC

To the lightshow: how astronomy and Virginia Woolf inspired the Royal Ballet

Woolf Works by the Royal Ballet takes its inspiration from Virginia Woolf and her fascination with the huge changes in scientific thought during her lifetimeVirginia Woolf lived and worked at a time of monumental change in our understanding of the universe. The initial decades of the 20th century saw the biggest revolution in our thinking since Isaac Newton in the seventeenth century and this generated a great deal of popular interest in the subject, too. Related: Who's afraid of Virginia Wool

Posted by Across the universe

Thursday
May 07 2015
19:13 UTC

Tales (Tails?) of Two Comets: Prospects for Q1 PanSTARRS & G2 MASTER

Did you catch the performance of Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy earlier this year? Every year provides a few sure bets and surprises when it comes to binocular comets, and while we may still be long overdue for the next truly Great Comet,' 2015 has been no exception. This week, we'd like to turn your attention […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
May 06 2015
21:32 UTC

NASAs Ten-Engine Electric Plane

NASA has been grabbing headlines recently with their potentially game-changing emDrive propulsion system. The emDrive has generated a lot of discussion, and a lot of controversy too. But NASA has a lot more going on than futuristic space travel designs, and one recent test flight showed that the minds at NASA are still working on […]

Posted by Universe Today

Wednesday
May 06 2015
19:05 UTC

Hidden in the Light

How¬Spectroscopy Fills in the Blanks in our KnowledgeBack when I was in graduate school, I was part of a Hubble Space Telescope team that had an instrument called the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph onboard the telescope. I had a lot to learn about spectroscopy, and my team leader introduced me to the topic by saying,

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Friday
May 01 2015
15:50 UTC

Put Your Mom on a Mars Map

Help Fund Science Education and ResearchI've written many times about Uwingu, the group of people that fundraises for science education and research by selling names for craters on their Mars maps. The idea is simple: when Mars explorers step out onto the surface of the Red Planet sometime in the next couple of decades, they'll

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Thursday
Apr 30 2015
18:56 UTC

It Just Gets More Exciting from Here!

Possible Pluto Features SightedThe news from the¬New Horizons¬mission just keeps getting better. The latest images, combined into an animation, show what might be a polar cap on the dwarf planet. It's the best picture yet of this distant, tiny world. The good news is, as the spacecraft gets closer, the images are just going to

Posted by TheSpacewriter's Ramblings

Thursday
Apr 30 2015
15:25 UTC

Mercury MESSENGER Mission Concludes with a Smashing Finale!

The planet Mercury will soon have a brand new 52-foot-wide crater. At 3:26 p. m. ¬EDT this afternoon, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft will finally bite the Mercurial dust, crashing into the planet's¬surface at over 8,700 mph near the crater Janacek. Because the impact will happen out of sight and communication with the Earth, the MESSENGER team plans […]

Posted by Universe Today

Thursday
Apr 30 2015
15:04 UTC

Crossing Quarters: Would the Real Astronomical Midway Point Please Stand Up?

Happy May Day Eve! Maybe May 1st is a major holiday in your world scheme, or perhaps you see it as the release date of Avengers: Age of Ultron. We're approximately mid-way between the March equinox and the June solstice this week, as followers of the Gregorian calendar flip the page tomorrow from April to […]

Posted by Universe Today

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